May 02, 2013

"Why silence? Aren’t we trying to fight against silence?” Saad, a 2010-2011 GLSEN Student Ambassador, shares how silence on the Day of Silence is used as a powerful tool for direct action and social change:

Are you participating? Make sure you’re registered so that we can support you and your school. Register today and join the movement!

April 30, 2013

Today is the culmination of GLSEN's Safe Schools Advocacy Summit, a weekend of learning and lobbying in Washington, DC. Right now, more than 40 GLSEN activists are urging their representatives in Congress to make safer schools for all students. If you're sad that you can't be at the Capitol today - don't be! We've got live updates and videos to transport you from the halls of your school to the halls of power. Here's what's happened so far today: 10:38 am  After breakfast, Emma and César filmed a message as they got ready for their first meetings:

11:45 am Emma had a great meeting with the office of Senator Dick Durbin:

12 pm César might have been super nervous before his meeting with Senator Kay Hagan's office, but it went perfectly!

1:15 pm Emma met with the office of one of the co-sponsors of the Safe Schools Improvement Act, Senator Mark Kirk. What a great chance to say, "Thanks!"

2:30 pm That's a full day for Emma! Three meetings down, three great opportunities to discuss safer schools. Check out her video:

3 pm César is heading into his next meeting...

3:30 pm ... and leaving the meeting:

5 pm César rounded out the day with a late visit to Senator Burr's office:

May 03, 2013

When the lights came back on after GLSEN's screening of How to Survive a Plague last month, everyone in the room knew they'd seen a special film. We weren't the only ones impressed, apparently, as the movie received an Oscar nomination today for Best Documentary. How to Survive a Plague is one of the best documentaries I've ever seen, and I couldn't be more excited to see it receive national recognition. The film follows two coalitions, ACT UP and TAG (Treatment Action Group), through the HIV/AIDS crisis during the late '80s and early '90s. The groups used political activism and civil disobedience to help shift AIDS from a near-certain death sentence to a manageable, but still serious, disease. Eliza Byard, our executive director, noted the connection between the atmosphere of the era and the birth of GLSEN: "My mother attended a founding meeting for GLSEN's New York City chapter at the time," she said, "walking through one of the very ACT UP meetings depicted in the film to a boiler room off the back where Kevin Jennings was greeting volunteers." How to Survive a Plague will compete with 5 Broken Cameras, The Gatekeepers, The Invisible War, and Searching for Sugar Man for the award. If you're interested in other documentaries about the HIV/AIDS crisis, check out We Were Here, which focuses on San Francisco, and  30 Years From Here, which reflects on three decades of HIV/AIDS in the US. Congratulations again to the director/producer David France and everyone else connected with the film!  

May 03, 2013

Here at GLSEN, we're always looking for the next big way to get the word out about the amazing work we do. Our newest tool is called a Spark, and it looks like this:

 

The Spark is an awesome way for us to highlight our work in a way that compels people to take action, which is always super important! GLSEN couldn't make such a big difference without an energized supporter base working hard across the country. This could not have come at a better time, as GLSEN is now in the running to win $1 million in the Chase American Giving Awards! Through the widget, you can watch a video where Eliza describes GLSEN's important work, follow our Twitter feed, sign up for our email list, and vote for us in the Chase American Giving Awards. There are a ton of easy ways you can help make schools safer for LGBT students by using this Spark! You can embed the player on your personal website, blog or Tumblr by clicking on the "Share" button on the Spark and copying the embed code. You can also add the Spark to your Facebook or Twitter by clicking on their respective buttons. If you haven't yet, you can always vote for GLSEN on Chase's Facebook page, and Chase card holders can vote a second time at ChaseGiving.com. This last part is super exciting: you only have to embed the Spark once to get constantly updated content from GLSEN. After the Chase Awards end, we'll be updated the Spark with new content and new calls to action on a regular basis, without you having to do a thing! Please share this cool new tool with your friends, and let's keeping working to make safe schools for ALL students in America.    

May 03, 2013

GLSEN is one of 25 charities competing for a chance to win $1 million in the Chase Community Giving Awards. Our hope of winning and expanding our work to create a world in which every child learns to value and respect all people regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity/expression depends on your votes! Voting is now open, so don’t waste any time helping create safe schools for all students!

  1. Vote! November 27 marks the first day of the competition, so make sure you vote! You can vote once on Facebook and once more at ChaseGiving.com if you are a Chase account holder. The contest ends December 4 at 11:59 p.m.
  2. Sign up for our mailing list: Visit glsen.org/chase to sign up. By signing up to receive emails, you can stay informed of the great work your support enables GLSEN to do. Hopefully, we’ll be able to email you on December 8 with $1 million to help make safe schools.
  3. Show your support on Facebook. After you vote, you can let the world know that you chose GLSEN by “liking” us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/GLSEN. Let you friends know you voted, and ask them to show their support as well.
  4. Tell your friends about the contest. Let your friends and family know that you support making school safe for all students. After you vote for GLSEN, make sure your friends know about the amazing work GLSEN could do with $1 million.
  5. Donate a tweet a day at http://justcoz.org/glsen. Looking for an easy way to let your followers know that you support GLSEN? Donate a tweet a day and join a network of students, educators, parents, administrators, and supporters who are working to make schools safer. Your tweets will help spread the word about ways we can all make a difference!

Thank you for your support of GLSEN!  

May 03, 2013

Though Hurricane Sandy hit GLSEN’s national headquarters hard last week, we’re happy to announce that all staff and chapter leaders are safe and sound. We’re ready to get back to work making schools safer, though we aren’t able to return to the New York City office just yet. It’s not clear when the New York office will reopen, but our DC office is ready for business. That’s good news, because GLSEN will be tackling several big issues in the next few weeks, including:

  • Partnering with the DC and Baltimore public schools in support of the well-being and success of LGBT youth of color;
  • Training members of the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) on LGBT issues and gender nonconformity in grades K-5; and
  • Furthering LGBT curricular inclusion with a presentation at the annual conference of the National Council for the Social Studies.

The response to the hurricane has been touching, and we are truly grateful for the overwhelming show of support. Not only from our friends at the Ad Council, who kindly offered us workspace in Manhattan, but also from countless friends of GLSEN reached out through email and social networking sites to express support. Here’s a selection of your tweets wishing us well. Thanks again for your support; it truly makes our work possible.

 

May 03, 2013

Hey everyone! I’m Matthew McGibney, and I’m super excited to join GLSEN as the new communications assistant! I’ll be pitching in with the blog, so I thought I’d take a second to introduce myself. I graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill this past May, where I studied public relations in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Attending UNC was an incredible experience, and I feel so fortunate to have been able to interact with some of the future leaders of the LGBT rights movement. GLBTSA, the university’s LGBT student organization, has a big presence on campus, and I’m proud to have sat on its board for a semester. Last year I co-chaired the ninth annual Southeast Regional Unity Conference, which brings together LGBT students and allies from across the south. The conference was primarily aimed toward college students, but the high school students in attendance brought a completely fresh perspective. It can be easy to forget how tough it is to be a high school student trying to establish a GSA or participate in Day of Silence after you’ve graduated, but the students truly reminded me that those challenges are a real struggle every day. At the same time, seeing 400 LGBT college students living open lives made just as much of an impact on the high school students, many of whom came from places that were not as LGBT-friendly as Chapel Hill. I hope those students realized that it does get better, but that there's no reason you can't change your world today. I’m excited to have joined GLSEN, and I hope I can do my part to make a better world a reality. Best, Matthew  

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