How "Bully" created an opportunity to look for solutions

This entry is by Student Ambassador Brandon S.

A week ago I was invited to speak on a panel after a screening of Lee Hirsh's new movie Bully. I remember how a few days before I was invited a headline caught my eye while I was flipping through articles in my phone. "Motion Picture Accreditation Association: Don't let the bullies win! Give 'bully' a PG-13 instead of an R rating."

I researched the issue, Bully was given an R rating for "language", about 3 instances when students cursed while bullying another student, which is completely appropriate for a movie ABOUT bullying.

As an GLSEN Media Ambassador, I realized that the film could reach the most people that needed to see it, youth who are bullied or people who bully others that don't feel comfortable telling their parents about their situation, if it was rated PG-13.

I was confident about my knowledge on how Bully would help students and adult allies across the country address and fight bullying, but I was nonetheless nervous to be on a panel with Eliza Byard, GLSENs executive director, congressmen Mike Honda, a leader in the Japanese American (JA) community and the director himself, Lee Hirsh, but confidence came to envelop me as I remembered my ambassador training with GLSEN just a few months before, and the opportunity afforded to me to represent youth issues on a forum with community leaders I admired.

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